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215 athletes to represent Team Canada at the Beijing 2022 Olympic Winter Games

BEIJING (January 28, 2022) –  The Canadian Olympic Committee (COC) announced that Team Canada’s delegation of 215 athletes, the country’s third-largest Winter Olympic contingent, and 85 coaches will be participating at the Beijing 2022 Olympic Winter Games. The nomination of 106 athletes who identify as female is the most-ever in Canadian Winter Olympic history.

The Beijing 2022 Olympic Winter Games will take place February 4 to February 20. Approximately 2,900 athletes from 90 National Olympic Committees are expected to participate. There are 109 events in seven Olympic winter sports which take place in 13 competition venues across three competition zones – Beijing, Yanqing and Zhangjiakou.

The full list of athletes and coaches with breakdown by sport and home province can be viewed here. Team Canada athlete biographies can be found here.

Download Team Canada’s Olympic Winter Games Statistical Guide here.

QUOTES:

“Over the past 14 months as Chef de Mission, I have felt privileged to witness these athletes put their hearts and souls into earning their Olympic spots in the most challenging of circumstances. More than just their incredible performances, the ways in which they have managed to adapt to all these constant changes is impressive. The Games themselves will amount to the defining chapter and I look forward to witnessing them all write this chapter beautifully and passionately.”

– Catriona Le May Doan, two-time Olympic champion and Team Canada’s Chef de Mission for the Beijing 2022 Olympic Winter Games

“We are so incredibly proud of this team. These 215 athletes have dealt with so many obstacles and adversity on the road to representing Team Canada at Beijing 2022. Through every struggle they have faced during the pandemic, they have continually demonstrated bravery, resilience and determination. Beyond what athletes will achieve at Games, their journey to get here will provide much hope and inspiration. Our success at Games will be measured by the health and safety of Team Canada and on the ability for athletes to step on the field of play and live out their dreams. We look forward to the incredible and inspiring stories that will come from these Olympic Games.”

– Eric Myles, Chief Sport Officer, Canadian Olympic Committee

“Six months ago I would have thought going to the Games was practically impossible, but after an exciting season, full of ups and downs I am thrilled that I get to be a part of Team Canada for the 2022 Olympics. I was still quite young when the Vancouver Olympics took place, however I will never forget watching the Olympic torch getting run past my house or when one of the figure skaters gave me her flowers. It was so inspiring to see those athletes compete which was the beginning of my own Olympic dream. I am so grateful that I am now the one that gets to share this wonderful experience with the world.”

– Natalie Corless, Team Canada luge athlete nominated to make Olympic debut at Beijing 2022

“Getting to my first Olympics was a dream come true, so to have a chance to play again, and wear the maple leaf, is a privilege and one that I’ll never take for granted. It’s been a busy couple of months of preparation so I can’t wait to get on the ice in Beijing.”

– Jennifer Jones, Skip of Team Canada’s Women’s Curling Team

BEIJING 2022 CANADIAN OLYMPIC TEAM FACTS AND FIGURES

Athletes who identify as female or are competing in women’s events:

  • Number of athletes: 106
  • Youngest: Brooke D’Hondt, 16 (March 9, 2005), Snowboard;
  • Oldest: Jennifer Jones, 47 (July 7, 1974), Curling

Athletes who identify as male or are competing in men’s events:

  • Number of athletes: 109
  • Youngest: Émile Nadeau, 18 (January 13, 2004), Freestyle Skiing;
  • Oldest: John Morris, 43 (December 16, 1978), Curling

Sets of siblings:

  1. Chloé Dufour-Lapointe (Freestyle Skiing – Moguls) and Justine Dufour-Lapointe (Freestyle Skiing – Moguls)
  2. Christian Gow (Biathlon) and Scott Gow (Biathlon)
  3. Hannah Schmidt (Ski Cross) and Jared Schmidt (Ski Cross)
  4. Cassie Sharpe (Freestyle Skiing – Halfpipe) and Darcy Sharpe (Snowboard – Slopestyle/Big Air)
  5. Broderick Thompson (Alpine skiing) and Marielle Thompson (Ski cross)

Children of Olympians:

  • Laurent Dubreuil (Long Track Speed Skating) – Robert Dubreuil (Father) and Ariane Loignon (mother)
  • Miha Fontaine (Freestyle Skiing) – Nicolas Fontaine (father)
  • Erik Read (Alpine Skiing) – Ken Read (father)
  • Cody Sorensen (Bobsleigh) – Ole Sorensen (father)

Provincial and territorial breakdown*:

  • Alberta: 40
  • British Columbia: 32
  • Manitoba: 9
  • New Brunswick: 1
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: 3
  • Northwest Territories: 0
  • Nova Scotia: 4
  • Nunavut: 0
  • Ontario: 60
  • Prince Edward Island: 1
  • Quebec: 57
  • Saskatchewan: 6
  • Yukon: 1
  • Athletes born outside Canada: 1

*Based on athletes’ preferred home province or territory.

Athletes who previously attended a Games:

  • Olympic Winter Games
    • Pyeongchang 2018 – 91
    • Sochi 2014 – 38
    • Vancouver 2010 – 17
    • Turin 2006 – 3
  • Winter Youth Olympic Games
    • Lausanne 2020 – 2
    • Lillehammer 2016 – 7
    • Innsbruck 2012 – 3

Olympic rookies: 117

Olympic medallists: 45

Most Olympic appearances at the Olympic Winter Games: 

5 – Charles Hamelin (2006, 2010, 2014, 2018, 2022)

OLYMPIC VILLAGE OCCUPANCY BY SPORT:

Zhangjiakou:

  • Biathlon – 8
  • Cross Country – 9
  • Freestyle Skiing – 24
  • Ski Cross – 8
  • Ski Jumping – 4
  • Snowboard – 23

Yanqing:

  • Alpine Skiing – 13
  • Bobsleigh – 18
  • Luge – 6
  • Skeleton – 3

Beijing:

  • Curling – 12
  • Figure Skating – 13
  • Hockey – 48
  • Speed Skating – 26

Information regarding Team Canada at Beijing 2022, including competition schedules, results and historic Canadian Olympic Winter Games statistics can be found at olympic.ca/press.

Photo and story courtesy of the Canadian Olympic Committee.